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Victor Induction Disc motor torque
http://forum.talkingmachine.info/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=36408
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Author:  fran604g [ Sun Jul 15, 2018 6:29 am ]
Post subject:  Victor Induction Disc motor torque

Hiya folks,

Out of curiosity, how much torque should the induction disc motor on my Credenza X have? I've discovered a couple of mid-20s records that slow it down considerably, but will play fine on my Victrola XVI.

Best,
Fran

Author:  JerryVan [ Sat Jul 21, 2018 9:47 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Victor Induction Disc motor torque

Just a wild shot in the dark, but could your induction disc motor be from Canada and made to run on 25 cycle current? Might explain a weak performer.

Author:  fran604g [ Sun Jul 22, 2018 7:24 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Victor Induction Disc motor torque

JerryVan wrote:
Just a wild shot in the dark, but could your induction disc motor be from Canada and made to run on 25 cycle current? Might explain a weak performer.

The label on the underside of the motor board states "2.0 Amperes 110 volts 25 to 60 cycles Alternating Current".

Here are a couple photos.

Best,
Fran
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Author:  fran604g [ Sun Jul 22, 2018 8:13 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Victor Induction Disc motor torque

I should add that the issue of the turntable slowing down during play with some records seems to be resolved, thanks to help from member pianolist.

I lubricated and adjusted the motor. Then I discovered that the tonearm U-tube joint was binding when the soundbox was lowered into play position. I hypothesized this may have been causing the needle to add significant downward force on some records - because it could not freely move up and down with any slight imperfections of the record's flatness - some of the time.

I disassembled the tonearm, cleaned the joint thoroughly, reassembled it with fresh lithium grease, and carefully tightened the collett so that the U-tube can swivel with no undue binding or slop.

All seems well now.

As for my OP, I'd still like to know how much torque these motors are capable of producing - if anyone knows. That's just my insatiable curiosity more than anything else. :)

Additionally, I use a variac to reduce my mains voltage to an appropriate level to power the motor.

Best,
Fran

Author:  marcapra [ Mon Jul 23, 2018 4:05 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Victor Induction Disc motor torque

Fran, Good fix! I have a Victrola 8-9 X and I don't seem to have any problem with the torque. But I did notice that my tonearm does seem to bind up a bit when I place the reproducer down on a record. That's a good procedure you described. I think I'll do it to mine too. BTW, what gauge wire are you using for the power cord? I need to find that female plug and buy some cloth wire, but was told that lamp wire on Ebay is too small a gauge for the turntable motor.

Thanks, Marc.

Author:  fran604g [ Mon Jul 23, 2018 8:06 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Victor Induction Disc motor torque

marcapra wrote:
Fran, Good fix! I have a Victrola 8-9 X and I don't seem to have any problem with the torque. But I did notice that my tonearm does seem to bind up a bit when I place the reproducer down on a record. That's a good procedure you described. I think I'll do it to mine too. BTW, what gauge wire are you using for the power cord? I need to find that female plug and buy some cloth wire, but was told that lamp wire on Ebay is too small a gauge for the turntable motor.

Thanks, Marc.

Marc,

Thank you for your comment.

Evidently the original on/off switch failed long ago, and someone bypassed it with a toggle switch, and apparently at the same time replaced the short jumper cord as well. The cord and switch that were installed on mine, appear to have been there for a very long time. I believe the components to be of 1950's vintage, but can't know for sure. The switch is a laminated phenolic construction (and rated at a higher value [3A@250V] than the motor), and the cord is identical to the type that I've seen used on radios/televisions of the 40's through the 70's. It's of fairly light gauge (20 ga.?) wire.

I was contemplating the restoration of the original switching mechanism (it has broken parts, and the switch is long-gone), but I really like the convenience of the toggle switch, and I've read/heard that the original configuration can be a little temperamental. Also, earlier records without the eccentric groove at the end, wouldn't actuate the brake/on/off mechanism anyway, so the toggle switch is much more favorable for me. Personally, I think of this arrangement as part of the machine's history now.

The Victrola Induction Disc motor (according to the pasted-on paper label on the underside of the motor board) states a current draw of 2.0 amps @ 110 VAC, so I don't see why lamp wire (18-20 ga.) wouldn't be heavy enough to use. Obviously the cord on mine isn't very heavy, but 2 amps isn't a very heavy load either, IMO. I haven't attempted to measure the actual current draw of my motor. I'm sure there are many others here with much more competence in this topic than I. I'm not Underwriters Laboratories, so proceed with caution. ;)

Justin doesn't state which gauge wire his cord uses. For posterity, here's a link to the extension cord being sold on eBAY by Justin Schaub (ladanjus) https://www.ebay.com/itm/Replica-Electric-Cord-for-Antique-Phonograph-Victrola-Electrola-Radio-Radiola/221002862386.

I'm no electrical expert, so I'll defer to those with more expertise.

If I could find the same vintage female end used for his cords, I'd make one up myself -- but thus far, I haven't found any.

Best,
Fran
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