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 Post subject: Re: My First Modern Turntable - Brunswick Charleston Video
PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 2017 2:26 pm 
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Victor IV
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Technics is also bringing back a version of the SP-10.

https://news.panasonic.co.uk/technics-announces-launch-of-reference-class-direct-drive-turntable-sp-10r/

Original SP-10's have long had a place with collectors of vintage discs. But they aren't getting any younger, the speed control electronics are apt to go on the fritz with some of them.


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 Post subject: Re: My First Modern Turntable - Brunswick Charleston Video
PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2017 8:52 pm 
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Victor IV
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WDC wrote:
Wolfe wrote:
Seems to resemble closely the current Stanton ST-150. They're made in the same factory, I believe. The original Stanton ST-150 was all metal, and weighed over 40 pounds. The current model (MK 2) is about half that. They may retain the same high torque motor. High torque is best for spinnin' 78's.


Just checked detailed photo of the ST-150 and yes, it's very close and surely made at the same factory. The S-tonearm is exactly the one I have and fortunately has the similar geometry to the SL-1210. That makes switching pickups quite easy. Also the maximum torque is ranging between 2.5 and 4.5 kg/cm, exactly the same.

It is quite interesting, that both the SL-1210 MK2 and later turntables have the same specs at 0,025% WRMS and -78 dB rumble as the new SL-1200GR. The original Technics design for the upper torque drive had expired, which is the reason for the other brands that are now on the market. Only the torque is higher at 2.2 kg/cm compared to 1.5 kg/cm. So, the main reason for the new upper torque design was likely a new patent protection for Panasonic.


I bought an ST-150 (S- arm) last week, a lightly used original model that has the steel upper part of the base / plinth. Been playing with it for a week. It's quite nice. Very solid, heavy, 42 pounds. 3 speed, 8 / 25 / 50 % pitch control. Adjustable tonearm height, interchangeable headshell, etc. It sounds very good, too. I'm pleased. Would recommend highly for the price range. Should be in range of 600 dollars or less, used. Does not come with a dustcover. I was able to kipe one off another old TT I had that happened to fit.

Can't speak the for the new MK2 150's. They appear to be the same, though. Except for replacing the steel with aluminum.


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 Post subject: Re: My First Modern Turntable - Brunswick Charleston Video
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2017 3:48 pm 
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Victor III
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Wolfe wrote:
Should be in range of 600 dollars or less, used.


It's quite remarkable how the prices for these turntables went up over the last few years. I paid €389 for my RP-6000 about four years ago.


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 Post subject: Re: My First Modern Turntable - Brunswick Charleston Video
PostPosted: Fri Sep 15, 2017 11:47 am 
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Victor II
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At the heavier tracking weights (over 2 grams) that you would normally play back older records, anti-skate just isn't needed.


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 Post subject: Re: My First Modern Turntable - Brunswick Charleston Video
PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2017 7:06 am 
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Victor III
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I wouldn't fully agree to that as the skating force increases with additional weight. A normal 78rpm record in good condition will normally play fine indeed, but as soon as you have a record with problems or less grip (Pathé anyone?), you will be thankful to have anti-skating available.


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 Post subject: Re: My First Modern Turntable - Brunswick Charleston Video
PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2017 2:26 pm 
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Victor IV
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I've found the common Shure M78S stylus the most successful at playing vertically cut Pathé discs of anything I own. I think it's the compliant cantilever on the thing.

I know I could just buy an 8.0 mil stylus or whatever, but it's something I would use infrequently.


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