The Talking Machine Forum — For All Antique Phonographs & Recordings

It is currently Tue Jul 23, 2019 5:02 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 15 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Recordio Record
PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2019 10:28 am 
Offline
Victor V
User avatar
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:33 pm
Posts: 2779
Location: Near NY's Capital
bfinan11 wrote:
I've found a bunch of these, usually a typical 78 rpm stylus (Shure N78S, 2.8mm) works quite well.

Semi-related question: one stack of them from 1941 was recorded at about 60 RPM. Was this ever standard or did someone have a wildly out of tune machine?


I imagine some recording machines had constantly variable speeds, like Victor home units did. I have a pile of line checks, not the same I mentioned before, that play at about 27-28 RPM. They play with a 1.0 mil stylus and sound horrible with anything else. Why the very slow RPM and smaller groove is anyone's question, a few well known transfer guys have seen these and asked the same questions I did, but they sound fantastic and were obviously professionally done line checks from the 1930s. In my 35 years of transferring things like this, I've just always found that having a selection of sizes can make a gigantic difference, unless the recording itself was poorly done to begin with.

Sean


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Recordio Record
PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2019 1:06 pm 
Offline
Victor III
User avatar
Joined: Sat Aug 12, 2017 9:25 pm
Posts: 613
OrthoSean wrote:
bfinan11 wrote:
I've found a bunch of these, usually a typical 78 rpm stylus (Shure N78S, 2.8mm) works quite well.

Semi-related question: one stack of them from 1941 was recorded at about 60 RPM. Was this ever standard or did someone have a wildly out of tune machine?


I imagine some recording machines had constantly variable speeds, like Victor home units did. I have a pile of line checks, not the same I mentioned before, that play at about 27-28 RPM. They play with a 1.0 mil stylus and sound horrible with anything else. Why the very slow RPM and smaller groove is anyone's question, a few well known transfer guys have seen these and asked the same questions I did, but they sound fantastic and were obviously professionally done line checks from the 1930s. In my 35 years of transferring things like this, I've just always found that having a selection of sizes can make a gigantic difference, unless the recording itself was poorly done to begin with.

Sean





This particular seems to, at certain points have fluctuations in speed. Only for a bit though. I do not know if it was the Recordio machine or what. If this record was recorded in '41 (seems to be) it would have been in the "home recording" infancy right?


Anyway, I just boxed up the record to mail out to you Sean and see what you can do with it.


-Travis


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Recordio Record
PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2019 6:24 pm 
Offline
Victor I
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 11:49 pm
Posts: 186
travisgreyfox wrote:
If this record was recorded in '41 (seems to be) it would have been in the "home recording" infancy right?


That particular form of home recorder, yes - there were earlier systems using pre-grooved discs going further back into the 1930s, and also of course brown wax cylinders, which were inherently recordable from 1889 on.

As far as I know Philco had the first of these home recorders, and released it in late 1939 or early 1940, followed shortly by the Recordio, both launched at the 1939-40 World's Fair, and 6-inch cardboard discs recorded at that fair are relatively common.

The label of your particular example, for what it's worth, matches mine that I know were recorded on or about October 1, 1941.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Recordio Record
PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2019 10:43 pm 
Offline
Victor III
User avatar
Joined: Sat Aug 12, 2017 9:25 pm
Posts: 613
bfinan11 wrote:
travisgreyfox wrote:
If this record was recorded in '41 (seems to be) it would have been in the "home recording" infancy right?


That particular form of home recorder, yes - there were earlier systems using pre-grooved discs going further back into the 1930s, and also of course brown wax cylinders, which were inherently recordable from 1889 on.

As far as I know Philco had the first of these home recorders, and released it in late 1939 or early 1940, followed shortly by the Recordio, both launched at the 1939-40 World's Fair, and 6-inch cardboard discs recorded at that fair are relatively common.

The label of your particular example, for what it's worth, matches mine that I know were recorded on or about October 1, 1941.



Cool stuff and great info. Does anyone a working recordio machine from the early 40s? It would be interesting to play with if you had a bunch of blanks lying around.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Recordio Record
PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2019 7:32 pm 
Offline
Victor III
User avatar
Joined: Sat Aug 12, 2017 9:25 pm
Posts: 613
Well OrthoSean worked his magic and cleaned up the record. If you would like to give it a listen he put up some live links.




https://app.box.com/s/y27y2izbxxwopyxwupg09du5t3qs8foq

https://app.box.com/s/k8zrr2oolwhw39twen4yn3ljr65y7k88

https://app.box.com/s/mufqb3vflxegd342az8623la95fix834

Thanks again Sean, great work (the record is in bad shape).


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 15 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Americanized by Maël Soucaze.