Horn gramophones to identify and discuss

Discussions on Talking Machines of British or European Manufacture
nostalgia
Victor III
Posts: 837
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2019 1:58 am
Personal Text: Keep winding up
Location: My gramophone repair room

Re: Horn gramophones to identify and discuss

Post by nostalgia »

I don't think the axis has ever been removed, at least I don't feel it that way, since I have not yet been able to remove the small gear at the end of the axis. The system applied reminds me of an old Union motor that I disassembled last year, so I guess this motor must be very old, maybe from around 1910?
If the axis has never been removed it looks of course like a very strange place for the spring to break, IF it was not attached to the set screw as drawn on the new uploaded photo. If it was attached at this mid section, the loop have simply broken off, something that is well known from for instance HMV 101 non return springs where a breakage often happen in the loop area. I have also drawn a line of the natural breaking point for the spring if it was attached to the set at the end of the complete spring. For the first option, the first section of the spring would then have no other function than preventing the last section of the spring to glide towards the winding handle end of the axis, something that maybe is far streched to believe...but....
I guess I will try to attach the spring by adding a new loop, since that is the only way to find out if the spring will work this way. If only the loop part has broken of it should work, if the full spring length is needed it will not work.

I have also been able to dig out a bit of information about the soundbox, with the DGG letters on it. I first asked in this thread if it could be "Deutche Grammophon Gesellschaft", but it is not, on the German forum I was able to find this link: https://grammophon-platten.de/e107_plug ... .php?37120 My German is not good, and part of the link shows exerpts taken from old newspaper, but I think it tells about a German man named Wilhelm Brée, who was a supplier for Lindstrom, and from 1908-1913 run a company in Berlin named: "Deutsche Graphonie Gesellschaft". ( If I understand the link correctly). It then explains the DGG letters and the Graphonie name on the soundbox, and also explains why there is a Lindstrom motor found inside the machine. Kind of interesting really, and I guess the machine is quite a rarity too:)
Attachments
Lindstrom motor 3.jpg

nostalgia
Victor III
Posts: 837
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2019 1:58 am
Personal Text: Keep winding up
Location: My gramophone repair room

Re: Horn gramophones to identify and discuss

Post by nostalgia »

As always, when possible, I like to give updates on end results, and mysteries solved when they appear that way.

I showed the Lindstrom motor to an old gramophone friend, who is really knowledgeable too, and he looked for a second at the non return spring and told me that actually two broken springs were attached to the axis. He supplied me with a new spring, and yesterday I installed the new anti return spring, cleaned the motor and added grease to the main spring, and finished up the overhaul of the cabinet. I decided here to call the machine a Graphonie gramophone, since Graphonie was an independent company for a short time, both as a supplier of metals and parts to Lindstrom, but also most probably sold their own gramophones during a period having their own trade name and logo on their soundboxes ( as referred to in the link in the above post). Because of it it also makes sense that a Lindstrom motor is found inside the machine.

The gramophone has been cleaned, and later on adding Howards Restor-A-Finish and accompanying wax to the wood cabinet. The horn has only been cleaned and will also be waxed, I think the horn looks nice as it is really. Another horn gramophone saved from oblivion ! :geek:
Attachments
Graphonie 1.jpg
Graphonie 2.jpg
Graphonie 3.jpg
Graphonie 4.jpg
Lindstrom single spring motor.jpg

epigramophone
Victor VI
Posts: 3717
Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2011 1:21 pm
Personal Text: An analogue relic trapped in a digital world.
Location: The Somerset Levels, UK.

Re: Horn gramophones to identify and discuss

Post by epigramophone »

An attractive Swiss/German machine, especially with the original horn decoration in such good condition.
What is written on the plaque on the motor board?

nostalgia
Victor III
Posts: 837
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2019 1:58 am
Personal Text: Keep winding up
Location: My gramophone repair room

Re: Horn gramophones to identify and discuss

Post by nostalgia »

Plaque shows name of gramophone shop in a nearby city, and here we can see the shop and the interior of the shop.
That's why I bought the machine really, because of this plaque... :clover:

I tried to spot my machine on the desk, but that would have been too much to expect.... :shock:
I am also trying to nail the year the photo was taken, but it is difficult, around 1910 is my guess...
Attachments
Shop2.jpg
Shop.jpg
Plaque.jpg

nostalgia
Victor III
Posts: 837
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2019 1:58 am
Personal Text: Keep winding up
Location: My gramophone repair room

Re: Horn gramophones to identify and discuss

Post by nostalgia »

I am adding another one, what would you say about this machine? I see some original parts here, but also wrong components, including the horn. And this decal, I have never seen it on a horn model, but that can be my lack of knowledge or observation. I also don't like the spindle...it looks "different", but maybe I am paranoid today...The soundbox is of course wrong too.
This is absolutely not a machine I consider buying, but I add it to learn more, and hopefully someone else also can learn from it.
Attachments
8.jpg
7.jpg
6.jpg
5.jpg
4.jpg
3.jpg
2.jpg
1.jpg

User avatar
Inigo
Victor IV
Posts: 1428
Joined: Mon Dec 18, 2017 1:51 am
Personal Text: Keep'em well oiled
Location: Madrid, Spain
Contact:

Re: Horn gramophones to identify and discuss

Post by Inigo »

My French tabletop style iii has the same decal, but in French. That decal was used in Spain and uk too, it's the previous version to the later well known plain nipper into a thick frame and no decoration.
The soundbox (substituted) seems a German Juwell Electro, a slightly larger version of the hmvno4. The crank looks original too.
Inigo

Post Reply