Nom-Y-Ka diaphragms

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Nom-Y-Ka diaphragms

Post by poodling around »

I have just read a gramophone magazine article saying that Nom-Y-Ka soundbox / reproducer diaphragms are far superior to mica ones.

I have never heard of NOM-Y-Ka diaphragms before and wonder what they were made from - and any other information.

I think they originated from the U.S.A. ?
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Re: Nom-Y-Ka diaphragms

Post by Curt A »

The Jewel Company made universal tonearms and adapters for phonographs to play vertical records. The included reproducers used "Nom-Y-Ka" diaphragms, which were made of some type of synthetic brown substance that resembled celluloid. I always wondered what the composition actually was...
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Re: Nom-Y-Ka diaphragms

Post by poodling around »

Curt A wrote: Sat Feb 20, 2021 9:35 am The Jewel Company made universal tonearms and adapters for phonographs to play vertical records. The included reproducers used "Nom-Y-Ka" diaphragms, which were made of some type of synthetic brown substance that resembled celluloid. I always wondered what the composition actually was...
Very interesting, thanks Curt.

Well, whatever it was, was very well thought of for a few years.
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Re: Nom-Y-Ka diaphragms

Post by gramophoneshane »

This is what it looks like.
It's like a cross between celluloid and bakelite- not as soft as celluloid but not quite as hard as bakelite.
Personally I think it sounds just as good as mica, but I've never replaced the gaskets on mine so don't know if it actually sounds better?
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Re: Nom-Y-Ka diaphragms

Post by poodling around »

gramophoneshane wrote: Sat Feb 20, 2021 1:24 pm This is what it looks like.
It's like a cross between celluloid and bakelite- not as soft as celluloid but not quite as hard as bakelite.
Personally I think it sounds just as good as mica, but I've never replaced the gaskets on mine so don't know if it actually sounds better?
Very interesting information and appreciated.

Thanks gramophoneshane.
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Re: Nom-Y-Ka diaphragms

Post by old country chemist »

Probably the name if the diaphragms Nom-Y-Ka means "No mica" Theses diaphragms could may have been an improvement on the Bozon's patent Tortoiseshell diaphragms, as at one time he wanted to break into the American market with his product. but I thought that years ago there was something mentioned about the diaphragm having a composite silk/resin composition, but they do LOOK like a "celluloid" or resinous material-Shall we ever know?

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Re: Nom-Y-Ka diaphragms

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Phenolic?

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Re: Nom-Y-Ka diaphragms

Post by poodling around »

old country chemist wrote: Sat Feb 20, 2021 3:19 pm Probably the name if the diaphragms Nom-Y-Ka means "No mica" Theses diaphragms could may have been an improvement on the Bozon's patent Tortoiseshell diaphragms, as at one time he wanted to break into the American market with his product. but I thought that years ago there was something mentioned about the diaphragm having a composite silk/resin composition, but they do LOOK like a "celluloid" or resinous material-Shall we ever know?
Very interesting indeed.

It made me smile when I realised from your information that it probably means 'No Mica'. I missed that connection entirely !

It is such a shame that there seem to be no examples of Bozon's patent Tortoiseshell diaphragms / soundboxes. :cry:
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Re: Nom-Y-Ka diaphragms

Post by chunnybh »

Here's an advert for the Jewel soundbox. The radio part looks like fun.
The diaphragms look like a celluloid rather than laminated silk. It would be good to find out exactly what it is.
Talking-Machine-1925-02-OCR-Page-0141-1.jpg
EMG used the Luxus and Jewel soundboxes during The Gramophone tests of 1925.
Also a short page on the Jewel.
http://www.gramophonemuseum.com/luxus-jewel.html

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Re: Nom-Y-Ka diaphragms

Post by Menophanes »

According to Frow & Sefl's book on Edison cylinder machines, some later Amberola reproducers were fitted with 'No-Myka' [spelt thus] diaphragms; the material is described as 'Japanese vellum'. I presume that the name, besides hinting at the material that is not used, is intended to look like a Japanese word. Is this the same substance that is being discussed in this thread, or is the similarity of name purely a coincidence?

Oliver Mundy.

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