The Gramophone Company in Antarctica

Discussions on Talking Machines of British or European Manufacture
Post Reply
nostalgia
Victor III
Posts: 928
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2019 1:58 am
Personal Text: Keep winding up
Location: My gramophone repair room

The Gramophone Company in Antarctica

Post by nostalgia »

I found this very interesting photo online, when reading about Roald Amundsen's South Pole Expedition in 1911 after first having sailed from Norway to Whale Bay in Antarctica with his ship "Fram".
A hut named "Framheim" (Fram's home) was built in Antarctica where the crew stayed during the winter before their on foot/sledge expedition into Antarctica to reach the South Pole.
In the text we read (translation): "The lux lamp in the ceiling (model AB Lux 200) provided both warmth and light, while the gramophone (Deutsche Grammophon AG, Monarch II), which was at the bottom of the long table, created a good atmosphere"

I have used google translate to translate the complete text from Norwegian to English for those who want to read more: https://translate.google.com/translate? ... /framheim/

I can't myself confirm that the gramophone is a DGAG, Monarch II, since I don't know this exact machine. It is very hard to see any horn, since the gramophone is surrounded by Norwegian flags.

PS. Roald Amundsen is sitting close to the gramophone, on the right side of the table.
Attachments
Framheim-inne-1024x999.jpg

poodling around
Victor IV
Posts: 1124
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2018 11:52 am

Re: The Gramophone Company in Antarctica

Post by poodling around »

nostalgia wrote: Sun Jun 06, 2021 5:25 am I found this very interesting photo online, when reading about Roald Amundsen's South Pole Expedition in 1911 after first having sailed from Norway to Whale Bay in Antarctica with his ship "Fram".
A hut named "Framheim" (Fram's home) was built in Antarctica where the crew stayed during the winter before their on foot/sledge expedition into Antarctica to reach the South Pole.
In the text we read (translation): "The lux lamp in the ceiling (model AB Lux 200) provided both warmth and light, while the gramophone (Deutsche Grammophon AG, Monarch II), which was at the bottom of the long table, created a good atmosphere"

I have used google translate to translate the complete text from Norwegian to English for those who want to read more: https://translate.google.com/translate? ... /framheim/

I can't myself confirm that the gramophone is a DGAG, Monarch II, since I don't know this exact machine. It is very hard to see any horn, since the gramophone is surrounded by Norwegian flags.

PS. Roald Amundsen is sitting close to the gramophone, on the right side of the table.
Wow ! What a great photograph and information.

Really glad you posted this.

Thank you.

epigramophone
Victor VI
Posts: 3851
Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2011 1:21 pm
Personal Text: An analogue relic trapped in a digital world.
Location: The Somerset Levels, UK.

Re: The Gramophone Company in Antarctica

Post by epigramophone »

Not only has captain Scott's gramophone been preserved, but you can buy a 2 CD set of the records he took to Antarctica.

https://www.emiarchivetrust.org/captain ... ramophone/

nostalgia
Victor III
Posts: 928
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2019 1:58 am
Personal Text: Keep winding up
Location: My gramophone repair room

Re: The Gramophone Company in Antarctica

Post by nostalgia »

Thank you for posting too Roger about Dr. Scott.

Just to emphasize, for everyone not knowing the details, we are here talking about two different and competing Antarctica expeditions, where Dr. Scott with his British expedition (British Antarctic Expedition 1910) arrived at the South Pole on January 17th 1912, thirty three day later than the expedition of Roald Amundsen from Norway (December 14th 1911). Dr. Scott together with his four companions sadly also died on their return from the South Pole through the Antarctica.

It is very interesting to know however that both expeditions, totally independent of each other, had The Gramophone company Monarchs accompanying them on the trip, and that at least the machine from Dr. Scott's trip has survived, along with the tracks from the expedition.

I guess we in a way can say, the Gramophone Company knew there would be a winner here and decided to "bet on two horses, it was what we often refer to as...a safe bet".

User avatar
Inigo
Victor IV
Posts: 1613
Joined: Mon Dec 18, 2017 1:51 am
Personal Text: Keep'em well oiled
Location: Madrid, Spain
Contact:

Re: The Gramophone Company in Antarctica

Post by Inigo »

The case is that of the DGAG models. The horn was probably removed to allow the flags to be installed for the photo. This scene has been carefully prepared, and the table set is humble, but well arranged. A touch of care and love can be felt
I noticed the bottle of Aquavit no1 in first term... A friend of mine, thirty years ago, talked me about this liquor, who said was typical of Scandinavian hunters and the like. He was 7 years older than me, and he was a well seasoned man, who had been everywhere in adventures and travels, and his experience was amazing. He was by then in his mid thirties...
Inigo

JerryVan
Victor VI
Posts: 3754
Joined: Mon Aug 24, 2009 3:08 pm
Location: Southeast MI

Re: The Gramophone Company in Antarctica

Post by JerryVan »

Ernest Shackleton had one too. I believe they even carried it along with them after their ship, the Endeavor, had been lost. (Any one of us would have done the same of course!)
Capture.PNG
Capture2.PNG
And, one from Scott's expedition, according to the crate on which it sits...
Capture3.PNG

nostalgia
Victor III
Posts: 928
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2019 1:58 am
Personal Text: Keep winding up
Location: My gramophone repair room

Re: The Gramophone Company in Antarctica

Post by nostalgia »

Vow, these are just great gramophone historic photos, Jerry. Thank a lot for posting.

Post Reply