Preserving Wooden Oak Horns, From Splits and Cracks?

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markiemark
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Preserving Wooden Oak Horns, From Splits and Cracks?

Post by markiemark »

I realise humidity and changes in temp contribute to this, but there must be a concoction made up of equal parts that you can apply to feed the wood and keep it nice and supple. What's your recipe? Something that packs a punch! Or does one resort to Howards Feed n Wax, Orange Oil, which is available, in New Zealand ;)) And is the Show at O'hare, Chicago still on. Cheers Markie :)
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AZ*
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Re: Preserving Wooden Oak Horns, From Splits and Cracks?

Post by AZ* »

I don't know of a magic concoction, but when I lived in a desert climate, I used large humidifiers to help keep the humidity inside my home at a reasonable level. That helped to keep the wood on the machines from getting too dry. I know in other areas, some people have the opposite problem -- too much humidity.

As for the June show, here's a link to the APS website. The APS will be making a decision on whether to hold the show soon.

https://www.antiquephono.org/events/202 ... o-banquet/

Click on "read more" or "Views details" on that page.

HTH
Best regards ... AZ*

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Inigo
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Re: Preserving Wooden Oak Horns, From Splits and Cracks?

Post by Inigo »

What about linseed or teka oils? These are intended precisely for that, feeding the wood. I've used boiled linseed oil for furniture and machine wood, and it works fine. It tends to darken the wood a bit, so I don't know if it can be used on clear oak. Herein there's a colleague that applies it in many layers, and gets a mirror like finish that is great!
Inigo

old country chemist
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Re: Preserving Wooden Oak Horns, From Splits and Cracks?

Post by old country chemist »

Hello Markie, "Feed and Wax" that contains the orange oil must be a nourishing polish. The oil of orange is an aromatic oil, and gives a nice fresh smell. It also has cleaning properties, and is safe, so perhaps that is the reason for it's addition.I expect the "Feed and Wax" contains carnauba and possibly other bolstering waxes, perhaps beeswax?
Teak oil, as it is a lot thinner that linseed will probably help. maybe 2 or 3 coats applied at intervals, say of a day between, to give it time to penetrate, might be useful. Linseed can be quite "gummy", and can, as Inigo states, darken the wood-but that would take some doing! Also, a fine half inch paintbrush carefully dipped into the teak oil, and applied with a stippling motion into the crevices would probably be better than mere applying with a cloth. Paint brushing first, then soft cloth to work it in and clean off excess, if any.
I expect some of the forum members have their own special branded products to recommend to you.

JerryVan
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Re: Preserving Wooden Oak Horns, From Splits and Cracks?

Post by JerryVan »

old country chemist wrote: Mon Apr 12, 2021 12:08 pm Hello Markie, "Feed and Wax" that contains the orange oil must be a nourishing polish. The oil of orange is an aromatic oil, and gives a nice fresh smell. It also has cleaning properties, and is safe, so perhaps that is the reason for it's addition.I expect the "Feed and Wax" contains carnauba and possibly other bolstering waxes, perhaps beeswax?
Teak oil, as it is a lot thinner that linseed will probably help. maybe 2 or 3 coats applied at intervals, say of a day between, to give it time to penetrate, might be useful. Linseed can be quite "gummy", and can, as Inigo states, darken the wood-but that would take some doing! Also, a fine half inch paintbrush carefully dipped into the teak oil, and applied with a stippling motion into the crevices would probably be better than mere applying with a cloth. Paint brushing first, then soft cloth to work it in and clean off excess, if any.
I expect some of the forum members have their own special branded products to recommend to you.
Don't all of these applications kind of assume there's no finish on the wood? With a good finish in place, how are these preservatives supposed to "get in"? I say just keep your humidity up and don't worry too much about it.

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