Home Recording

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SonnyPhono
Victor III
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Home Recording

Post by SonnyPhono »

I want to try my hand at recording but have a couple questions. First, I have a large horn for recording and a nice recorder. But I remember reading that recording is easier on the higher end machines. I have a very clean Edison Home that I was planning on using. Would it have the power to do the job? Also, I need to buy some recording blanks. Does anyone know where I could get some? And last, I will probably need to shave the blanks as I go through the learning process. Does anyone have any suggestions on the best way to go about shaving the blanks. (Buy a shaver for my Home?)

Thanks for the help!

gramophoneshane
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Location: Biggenden, Queensland, Australia

Re: Home Recording

Post by gramophoneshane »

I think most machines, except for maybe a gem, have enough power to obtain good recordings. It's when you come to shaving that you need a more powerful machine like a Home.
I use an Ediphone shaver for my cylinders, but a proper shaving attachment might be the way to go.
You can also rub them back with gasoline or turps on a rag, but it's not so easy to get an even flat surface.
Another option is to use a small sheet of glass that's the width of the cylinder, so you can shave the whole surface at once with the sharp edge, but I'd recommend using gloves, just in case the glass breaks.

martinola
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Re: Home Recording

Post by martinola »

I've gotten very good results recording with my Standard Model A, so I'm pretty sure that you'll be able to get the Home to do a nice job. I used the Standard for shaving and it took waaay too long to get it nice. Given that the home is also a single spring motor, I'd forget about it as a shaver and get an Ediphone shaver. They generally go for little money as they aren't all that interesting-looking. I'd avoid anything over $100 unless it was one of the cool-looking early ones in a wood cabinet.

I've used shaved moldy originals, but I hear good things about Paul Morris' reproduction cylinders from England:

http://www.paulmorrismusic.ndo.co.uk/

Good luck and let us know how you fare!

Martin

JohnM
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Re: Home Recording

Post by JohnM »

I would suggest caution when using an Ediphone or Dictaphone shaver. These are high-speed machines and conventional cylinders are not designed to be shaved upon them. If the cylinder is cracked (or has the beginning of a crack) or is too thin, it can fly apart either from the high rpm or if the shaver blade catches in a crack or chip. Be sure to close the lid when shaving a conventional cylinder. Dictaphone/Ediphone cylinders have a mesh reinforcement cast into the wax to prevent them from flying apart on the shaver. Not that one can't shave conventional cylinders on these, but just be careful!
"All of us have a place in history. Mine is clouds." Richard Brautigan

martinola
Victor III
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Re: Home Recording

Post by martinola »

Very good point, John! Thanks for bring that up. Plastic safety glasses are a good idea for this. (If you shave on my Standard, you don't so much need safety glasses as you need "no-doze".) :mrgreen:

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