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 Post subject: Is This A Repeater Mechanism?
PostPosted: Mon Mar 01, 2010 4:43 am 
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Victor III
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Joined: Wed Jul 22, 2009 3:59 am
Posts: 984
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Sorry about all the posts lately. I had to ask everyone about this one. I found this tonight and didn't think too much about it.

Image

But then I noticed this odd mechanism on the turntable.

Image

Is this a repeater of some sort? Is it rare? I have never seen anything like it before. Does anyone have anything like this?


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 Post subject: Re: Is This A Repeater Mechanism?
PostPosted: Mon Mar 01, 2010 9:58 am 
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Victor IV
Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2009 8:44 pm
Posts: 1565
I am not really overly familiar with those but I did have a version of one that resembled what you have. They all worked on some kind of principle similar to what your showing. How they worked I was never too sure however.

Larry


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 Post subject: Re: Is This A Repeater Mechanism?
PostPosted: Mon Mar 01, 2010 10:54 am 
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Victor V
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 3:47 am
Posts: 2489
Location: Jerome, Arizona
I'm on the road and don't have my F-P reference books, but as I recall, that is a Simplex repeater (don't hold me to that). Scott Corbett has one on an XVIII in his dining room. The reproducer plays toward center and when it reaches the center post, the metal arc track rises on a coarse screw in the post. This causes the reproducer to slide back toward an adjustable stop on the rim and the metal track -- now lowering -- deposits the needle at the start again. The repeater track is hinged and the bracket for that is secured to the top board with wood screws.

The brown square under the post is a Durium advertising record for Chevy, I believe. I have one at home.

I saw this on CL last night myself and figure that the repeater alone is worth ⅔ the cost of what they are asking for the package.
"All of us have a place in history. Mine is clouds." Richard Brautigan


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 Post subject: Re: Is This A Repeater Mechanism?
PostPosted: Mon Mar 01, 2010 11:13 am 
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Victor IV
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 7:12 pm
Posts: 1655
Here's a page about record repeaters -- http://www.myvintagetv.com/updates2/Rep ... eaters.htm

The patent illustrated on the site -- 1556667 -- comes close.


OF


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 Post subject: Re: Is This A Repeater Mechanism?
PostPosted: Mon Mar 01, 2010 12:55 pm 
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Victor Monarch Special
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"If you look for the bad in people expecting to find it, you surely will." - A. Lincoln
Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2009 6:08 pm
Posts: 6547
Location: New York's Finger Lakes
There were several manufacturers of these vertical screw repeaters, among them "Repeatograph" and "Repeater-Stop." They all work on a similar principle, which can be seen more easily than explained.

These devices work quite well and show up regularly these days. One note of caution: some manufacturers used pot metal for the vertical screw, so be sure it still turns freely before buying one!

George P.


Attachments:
File comment: In photo #1 below, the Victrola is playing normally, after the slideable arrows on the Repeater-Stop have been set for the beginning and end of the record. There is no contact with the record other than the needle.
Repeater1.jpg
Repeater1.jpg [ 1.19 MiB | Viewed 476 times ]
File comment: In photo #2 below, the sound box has been moved to show the action of the vertical screw. When the needle trips the "END" arrow, the vertical screw - which rotates constantly while the turntable is in motion - catches a pin on the Repeater-Stop's return arm, whose inner end is slowly raised like one end of a picnic bench.
repeater2.jpg
repeater2.jpg [ 1.09 MiB | Viewed 476 times ]
File comment: In photo #3 below, the return arm is raised higher and higher by the vertical screw, and the sound box (again moved away to better show the action of the Repeater-Stop) is lifted almost to the top of the arc. Then, it begins to slide...
repeater3.jpg
repeater3.jpg [ 1.05 MiB | Viewed 476 times ]
File comment: In photo #4 below, the sound box has slid down the return arm to the pre-set "BEGIN" arrow. The vertical screw is a double-helix, so once it reaches the top it gently lowers the return arm back to just above the surface of the record and, in so doing, gently lowers the needle of the sound box to the outer groove of the record.
repeater4.jpg
repeater4.jpg [ 1.1 MiB | Viewed 476 times ]
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 Post subject: Re: Is This A Repeater Mechanism?
PostPosted: Mon Mar 01, 2010 1:11 pm 
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Victor III
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Drawing a blank...
Joined: Wed Jul 22, 2009 3:59 am
Posts: 984
Location: Columbus, Ohio
I love asking these questions and knowing you all will have answers. Thanks John and George for your explanations. That cleared it up perfectly.

This phonograph is on craigslist if anyone is interested.

http://stlouis.craigslist.org/atq/1621182849.html

If anyone gets it, I would love to know and maybe see some closeup pics of it.


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 Post subject: Re: Is This A Repeater Mechanism?
PostPosted: Mon Mar 01, 2010 2:03 pm 
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Victor IV
Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2009 8:44 pm
Posts: 1565
I didn't catch it was a craigs list item at first. Its actually pretty near me. But I don't need it. Do you think that case has been refinished. It would seem it has?


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