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 Post subject: new cylinders in old tubes (shorn of moldy predecessors)
PostPosted: Sun Nov 10, 2019 6:21 pm 
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Victor II
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If you have a moldy wax cylinder in its original box lined with furry whatever it is, can a non-moldy wax cylinder safely be stored in the box, assuming typical modern "central heated/air conditioned home" temperature and humidity levels? Or is that just a formula for two moldy cylinders?

If not, is there a treatment that can be applied to the box to make it safe?

Inquiring minds want to know! Thanks for insights.


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 Post subject: Re: new cylinders in old tubes (shorn of moldy predecessors)
PostPosted: Sun Nov 10, 2019 6:28 pm 
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Victor V
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The cotton (or what have you) lining in cylinder boxes is considered a culprit for creating a fun environment for mold to party hardy, no ? So I would say no way, especially when the prior cylinder already had it's home crashed by said partiers. I would consider the lining contaminated.


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 Post subject: Re: new cylinders in old tubes (shorn of moldy predecessors)
PostPosted: Tue Nov 12, 2019 2:28 pm 
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Victor V
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I wondered this as well and decided to try an experiment after hearing about Lysol for killing mold on LP covers. I took a box that had contained a shot moldy two minute wax cylinder and did two things: first, outside on a nice sunny day, spray the inside lining liberally with Lysol disinfectant cleaner and let it bake in the sun all day (even a second if you wish) to let it all thoroughly dry out and kill any remaining mold. It worked for me. I've been going through some of the cylinders I re-boxed probably 5 years ago now and they're still fine. I'd almost think you could do a mild solution of bleach and distilled water in a spray bottle as well the same way, but I haven't had the need to try that. Yet.

Sean


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 Post subject: Re: new cylinders in old tubes (shorn of moldy predecessors)
PostPosted: Sat Nov 16, 2019 1:35 am 
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Victor II
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Thanks for the idea! I'll give that a try.


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 Post subject: Re: new cylinders in old tubes (shorn of moldy predecessors)
PostPosted: Sat Nov 16, 2019 1:53 am 
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Victor V
Joined: Tue Jan 21, 2014 12:55 am
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Location: Eugene/ Springfield Oregon USA
Rubbing alcohol is an effective mold killer.
"He who dies with the most shellac wins"- some nutty record geek


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 Post subject: Re: new cylinders in old tubes (shorn of moldy predecessors)
PostPosted: Mon Nov 18, 2019 11:08 am 
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Victor V
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gramophone-georg wrote:
Rubbing alcohol is an effective mold killer.


Funny you mention that, my home-brew all-purpose cleaning solution has that in it, along with vinegar, distilled water and a teeny bit of mild dish detergent. The stuff cleans anything in the house safely and effectively. I came across another random box of wax cylinders on a shelf in the garage this past weekend and these are trashed cylinders or they would never have been out there. The boxes look really nice, so I was thinking of trying this stuff on the lining to see what it may do. I'd imagine the vinegar will kill any remaining mold spores. I have some nice clean two minute wax hymns that never seem to be found damaged to use as guinea pigs in this case.

Sean


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 Post subject: Re: new cylinders in old tubes (shorn of moldy predecessors)
PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 1:28 pm 
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Victor Jr
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Isopropyl alcohol may be intermittently effective against fungus but it is not effective against fungal spores. Treatment of mold and fungus is generally considered a problem of moisture and humidity. Applying a surface level cleaner may have little or no effect on fungal removal. Bleach and hydrogen peroxide are more commonly associated with remedying mold and fungus outbreaks.

Officially, government organizations are somewhat conflicted on the use of bleach for mold.

The EPA does not recommend bleach.
The CDC recommends bleach as part of a mold remediation effort.


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